Ajobo is a witty acronym for Allison Johnelle Boron, a freelance writer and music industry maven based in New York City. She enjoys photography, collecting vinyl, and traveling. She dislikes writing bios in the third person. (more?)






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Getting Kinky
Elmore magazine, #49 (Mar/Apr 2012)

Ray Davies
Beacon Theatre
New York, NY

In 2010, a blood clot forced Ray Davies to cancel a run of U.S. tour dates, disappointing worried fans. Fortunately, the condition cleared up and he rescheduled his tour for last fall in a go-round that Davies calls complex, tough and good. “Touring, you get into a different mindset when you get out there,” says Davies, on the phone from his home in North London, “you adapt.”

Davies, who is currently finishing up a book, recording an album—“a mixture of a lot of the genres I’ve embraced in recent years”—for release later this year, and premiering a new musical he wrote called Come Dancing in March, called his stop at the Beacon Theatre in New York a highlight. “New York was a great show. I always love playing New York; it’s just a special place. I really loved playing Toronto, Philadelphia, Boston—the east coast is very special.

Davies’ performance at the Beacon included two halves: the first was a slowly-building acoustic set featuring his band from London (out west, Davies was backed by Los Angeles indie darlings the 88). The set list was impeccable, containing the anthemic “I’m Not Like Everybody Else,” “I Need You,” and Kinks staples like “Sunny Afternoon” and “Apeman.” For the second half, Davies and band were joined by New York’s Dessoff Choirs, channeling selections from Davies’ 2009 album, The Kinks Choral Collection. Choices like “Victoria” and “Picture Book” were no-brainers, but others, like “You Really Got Me” proved their versatility beyond the definitive versions.

“It just goes to show how some songs can express themselves different ways with different formats,” says Davies. “Songs should be flexible, and that’s what I found the joy of doing these shows was, how the songs were versatile. The secret is to do it in a way that it doesn’t sound organized. It’s like organized chaos. Probably combining rock music with choirs you’ve got to be a little bit looser than the orchestral concert.”

Onstage, Davies remained confident, if a bit modestly self-deprecating, mentioning his “hateful, spiteful” brother, Dave, and their historically contentious relationship. His repartee with the audience was an important facet of his performance, especially when a barrage of paper plates rained down on him, a traditional way for fans to make requests. “I’m glad they use cardboard plates and not real ones,” Davies laughs.

Stripping off his shoes and socks for an extended encore that included “Lola” and “Low Budget,” Davies appeared cool and energized as fans streamed out of their seats to congregate at the front of the stage. When he finished, he apologized to the audience, promising to come back and “do all of your requests,” and unlike some artists, Davies looked genuinely reluctant to leave the stage.

“Performing is something I was born to do,” he says. “When I was a kid, I was always drifting; I lived with an older sister as well as my parents. I was kind of always on the road, kind of a wandering spirit. It fits in with who I am.”


8/Mar | 2 years ago | ?20 | Reblog
 #ray davies,  #beacon theatre,  #the kinks,  #nyc concerts,  #new york city concerts,  #nyc,  #reviews,  #writing,  #march 2012